Monday, October 23, 2017

Latin Proverbs and Fables Round-Up: October 23

Here is a round-up of today's proverbs and fables - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. You can keep up with the latest posts by using the RSS feed, or you might prefer to subscribe by email.

HODIE (Roman Calendar): ante diem decimum Kalendas Novembres.

MYTHS and LEGENDS: The art image for today's legend shows The Danaids, and there are more images here.


TODAY'S MOTTOES and PROVERBS:

TINY PROVERBS: Today's tiny proverb is: Grata brevitas (English: Brevity is welcome).

PUBLILIUS SYRUS: Today's proverb from Publilius Syrus is: Sero in periclis est consilium quaerere (English: It is too late to seek advice in the midst of dangers).

PROPER NAME PROVERBS: Today's proper name proverb from Erasmus is Atlas caelum (English: Atlas holds up the sky; from Adagia 1.1.67). Here is a Greek-Latin gif:


ELIZABETHAN PROVERBS: Here is today's proverb commentary, this time by Taverner: Nemo mortalium omnibus horis sapit: No man in the world is wise at al houres. It is only belonging to God and properly due unto him never to commit follie. There is, I say, no man, but otherwiles doteth, but is deceived, but plaieth the foole, though he seme never so wise. Whan I say man, I except not the woman.

BREVISSIMA: The distich poster for today is Ad Torquatulum. Click here for a full-sized view.


And here are today's proverbial LOLcats... and for another "Fiat Lux," see the LOLBaby below:



Fiat lux!
Let there be light!

Altius tendo.
I strive to go higher.

Latin LOLBaby: Enzo is really looking grown up! Learn more at the blog.



Tuesday, October 17, 2017

Latin Proverbs and Fables Round-Up: October 17

Here is a round-up of today's proverbs and fables - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. You can keep up with the latest posts by using the RSS feed, or you might prefer to subscribe by email.

HODIE (Roman Calendar): ante diem sextum decimum Kalendas NovembresXX.

MYTHS and LEGENDS: The art image for today's legend shows Phaethon, and there are more images here.


TODAY'S MOTTOES and PROVERBS:

3-WORD MOTTOES: Today's 3-word motto is Memento semper finis (English: Always keep the goal in mind).

3-WORD PROVERBS: Today's 3-word proverb is Scarabeus aquilam quaerit (English: The beetle is looking for the eagle, alluding to the famous Aesop's fable).


RHYMING PROVERBS: Today's proverb with rhyme is: Os qui non claudit, quod non vult, saepius audit (English: He who doesn't close his mouth, often hears what he does want to).

VULGATE VERSES: Today's verse is Sicut fecisti, fiet tibi (Ob. 1:15). For a translation, check out the polyglot Bible, in English, Hebrew, Latin and Greek, at the Sacred Texts Archive online.

BREVISSIMA: The distich poster for today is Scientia et Caritas. Click here for a full-sized view.


And here are today's proverbial LOLcats:



Carcer numquam pulcher.
Prison is never pretty.

Mens alitur discendo et cogitando.
The mind is nourished by learning and thinking.

TODAY'S FABLE:

MILLE FABULAE: The English translation for today from the Mille Fabulae et Una book is Leo et Acies Eius, a story about a leader who embraces diversity!

Leo Imperator


Tuesday, October 10, 2017

Latin Proverbs and Fables Round-Up: October 10

Here is a round-up of today's proverbs and fables - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. I missed this weekend's post, but here's why: preparing some materials for a talk at Creighton later this month. The materials are all in English, but they are Aesop-related, so perhaps of interest. Father Greg Carlson is teaching a class this semester based on his amazing Aesop collection, and I'm helping out: Fables and Frames.


HODIE (Roman Calendar): ante diem sextum Idus Octobres.

MYTHS and LEGENDS: The art image for today's legend shows The Abduction of Persephone, and there are more images here.


TODAY'S MOTTOES and PROVERBS:

3-WORD MOTTOES: Today's 3-word verb-less motto is Recte faciendo securus (English: By acting rightly, no worries).

ANIMAL PROVERBS: Today's animal proverb is Equi donati dentes non inspiciuntur (English: You shouldn't look at the teeth of the horse that's a gift).

POLYDORUS: Today's proverb from Polydorus is: Iustitia in sese virtutes continet omnes (English: Justice contains in itself all the virtues).

GREEK PROVERBS: Today's proverb is Ἀπὸ μηχανῆς θεὸς (we use the Latin version in English: Deus ex machina).

BREVISSIMA: The distich poster for today is Damnun Alterius. Click here for a full-sized view.


And here are today's proverbial LOLcats:



Nullum magnum ingenium sine mixtura dementiae.
There is no great genius without some madness mixed in.

Litteras disce.
Learn your letters.

TODAY'S FABLE:

MILLE FABULAE: The fable from the Mille Fabulae et Una book is Testudo et Lepus, the famous story of the tortoise and the hare, with English versions here; you will also find the illustrations there which display in this animated gif:



Sunday, October 1, 2017

Latin Proverbs and Fables Round-Up: October 1

Here is a round-up of today's proverbs and fables - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. You can keep up with the latest posts by using the RSS feed, or you might prefer to subscribe by email.

HODIE (Roman Calendar): Kalendae Octobres, the Kalends of October.

MYTHS and LEGENDS: The art image for today's legend shows Heracles and Cacus, and there are more images here.


TODAY'S MOTTOES and PROVERBS:

TINY MOTTOES: Today's tiny motto is: Amo pacem (English: I love peace).

3-WORD PROVERBS: Today's 3-word verb-less proverb is Sapiens qui prospicit (English: Wise is the one who looks ahead)

AUDIO PROVERBS: Today's audio Latin proverb is Multae regum aures atque oculi (English: Many are the ears of kings, and their eyes). To read a brief essay about this proverb and to listen to the audio, visit the Latin Via Proverbs blog.

ERASMUS' ANIMALS: Today's animal proverb from Erasmus is Echinus partum differt (English: The hedgehog delays giving birth... which is bad news: the baby hedgehogs just get more and more prickly with each passing day; from Adagia 2.4.82).

BREVISSIMA: The distich poster for today is Quod Tibi, Hoc Aliis. Click here for a full-sized view.


And here are today's proverbial LOLcats:



Quod scripsi, scripsi.
What I have written, I have written.

Alta pete.
Seek lofty things.

TODAY'S FABLE:

I just recently found out that my Oxford Aesop's fables book is going to be translated into Chinese (!), so that has inspired me to translate the Mille Fabulae book into English. Fable by fable it will take a while... but paulatim sed firmiter, "slowly but surely."

MILLE FABULAE: The fable from the Mille Fabulae et Una book is Venditor et Creditor Eius, a story about marketing hype in the ancient world.




Sunday, September 24, 2017

Latin Proverbs and Fables Round-Up: September 24

Here is a round-up of today's proverbs and fables - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. You can keep up with the latest posts by using the RSS feed, or you might prefer to subscribe by email.

I have a fun announcement today! It's a beautifully illustrated Aesop book with fables and thoughts from John Lubans, plus gorgeous illustrations by Beatrice Coron: Fables for Leaders. You can also find out more at John's blog: Lubans.org.


HODIE (Roman Calendar): ante diem octavum Kalendas Octobres.

MYTHS and LEGENDS: The art image for today's legend shows Cupid Discovers Psyche, and there are more images here.


TODAY'S MOTTOES and PROVERBS:

TINY PROVERBS: Today's tiny proverb is: Nil recrastines (English: Do not put off till tomorrow).

PUBLILIUS SYRUS: Today's proverb from Publilius Syrus is: Tam deest avaro, quod habet, quam quod non habet (English: The miser lacks both what he has as well as what he doesn't).

PROPER NAME PROVERBS: Today's proper name proverb from Erasmus is Stupidior Praxillae Adonide (English: More stupid than the Adonis of Praxilla; from Adagia 2.9.11 ... This refers to a poetess Praxilla who wrote a poem about Adonis in which Adonis foolishly said that the most beautiful things in the world were the sun, apples, and pumpkins; including pumpkins in that list made Adonis look so foolish that he became a byword for foolishness).

ELIZABETHAN PROVERBS: Here is today's proverb commentary, this time by Conybeare: Jugulare mortuos: To kill dead menne. A proverbe applied to them which doe speake or write to the rebuke of menne that are deade, or as Erasmus doeth thinke it more apte, it may be sayed by them that impugne a boke, which is of all menne condemned, or reasoneth agaynst sentence of all menne reiected, or disprayseth a thinge which is of all menne abhorred.

BREVISSIMA: The distich poster for today is Ius Polis. Click here for a full-sized view.


And here are today's proverbial LOLcats:



Quod satis est, dormi.
Sleep as much as is enough.

Egomet sum mihi imperator.
I am my own boss.

TODAY'S FABLE:

MILLE FABULAE: The fable from the Mille Fabulae et Una book is Ursus et Amici Duo, a story of false friendship, with English versions here; you will also find the illustrations there which display in this animated gif:



Sunday, September 17, 2017

Latin Proverbs and Fables Round-Up: September 17

Here is a round-up of today's proverbs and fables - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. You can keep up with the latest posts by using the RSS feed, or you might prefer to subscribe by email.

HODIE (Roman Calendar): ante diem quintum decimum Kalendas Octobres.

MYTHS and LEGENDS: The art image for today's legend shows Heracles and Hesione, and there are more images here.


TODAY'S MOTTOES and PROVERBS:

3-WORD MOTTOES: Today's 3-word motto is Non deest spes (English: There is no lack of hope ... and see also the poem about hope below).

3-WORD PROVERBS: Today's 3-word proverb is Caritas omnia potest (English: Love can do all things).

RHYMING PROVERBS: Today's proverb with rhyme is: Damna fleo rerum, sed plus fleo damna dierum (English: I weep for things lost, but I weep more for days lost).

VULGATE VERSES: Today's verse is Qui fodit foveam, incidet in eam; et qui volvit lapidem, revertetur ad eumX (Proverbs 26:27). For a translation, check out the polyglot Bible, in English, Hebrew, Latin and Greek, at the Sacred Texts Archive online.

BREVISSIMA: The distich poster for today is Spes Me Erigit. Click here for a full-sized view.


And here are today's proverbial LOLcats:



Veloces sunt latronum pedes.
Swift are the feet of thieves.

Sedendo et quiescendo anima efficitur sapiens.
By sitting and resting, the soul is made wise.

TODAY'S FABLE:

MILLE FABULAE: The fable from the Mille Fabulae et Una book is Mures Duo, the famous story of the city mouse and the country mouse, with English versions here; you will also find the illustrations there which display in this animated gif:




Sunday, September 10, 2017

Latin Proverbs and Fables Round-Up: September 10

Here is a round-up of today's proverbs and fables - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. You can keep up with the latest posts by using the RSS feed, or you might prefer to subscribe by email.

HODIE (Roman Calendar): ante diem quartum Idus Septembres.

MYTHS and LEGENDS: The art image for today's legend shows Deidamia, and there are more images here.


TODAY'S MOTTOES and PROVERBS:

3-WORD MOTTOES: Today's 3-word verb-less motto is Cito, tuto, iucunde (English: Swiftly, safely, and happily).

ANIMAL PROVERBS: Today's animal proverb is Leonina societas periculorum plena (English: Alliance with a lion is full of dangers).

POLYDORUS: Today's proverb from Polydorus is: Caritas perfecta foras mittit timorem (English: Perfect love drives fear out of doors).

GREEK PROVERBS: Today's proverb is Μὴ κίνει κακὸν εὐ κείμενον (English: Don't move a bad thing that is well situated).

BREVISSIMA: The distich poster for today is Laetamur Graviora Passi. Click here for a full-sized view.


And here are today's proverbial LOLcats:



Nil melius laetam quam semper ducere vitam.
Nothing is better than to lead a happy life always.

Domus divisa contra se non stabit.
A house divided against itself will not stand.

TODAY'S FABLE:

MILLE FABULAE: The fable from the Mille Fabulae et Una book is Corvus et Vulpes Adulatrix, the famous story about the dangers of flattery, with English versions here; you will also find the illustrations there which display in this animated gif:



Monday, September 4, 2017

Special Edition: Dies Laboris - Labor Day

In honor of Labor Day, consider the motto of Oklahoma, "Labor conquers all," Labor omnia vincit in Latin.

LABOR OMNIA VINCIT




detail:




And some cats too of course:


Decus in labore.
There is dignity in work.



Labor ferendus est cibum petentibus.
Work must be endured by those seeking food.



Labor omnia superat.
Hard work overcomes all things.



Labore et scientia.
By means of effort and knowledge.



Ex labore dulcedo.
After effort, sweetness.



And a poster:


You be a worker, and God will be your helper.
(Latin: Esto laborator et erit Deus auxiliator.)



Sunday, August 27, 2017

Latin Proverbs and Fables Round-Up: August 27

Here is a round-up of today's proverbs and fables - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. You can keep up with the latest posts by using the RSS feed, or you might prefer to subscribe by email.

HODIE (Roman Calendar): ante diem sextum Kalendas Septembres.

MYTHS and LEGENDS: The art image for today's legend shows Theseus and the Minotaur, and there are more images here.


TODAY'S MOTTOES and PROVERBS:

TINY MOTTOES: Today's tiny motto is: Fiat iustitia (English: Let there be justice).

3-WORD PROVERBS: Today's 3-word verb-less proverb is Bellum dulce inexpertis (English: War is sweet to those who have not experienced it).

AUDIO PROVERBS: Today's audio Latin proverb is Multum, non multa (English: Much, not many). To read a brief essay about this proverb and to listen to the audio, visit the Latin Via Proverbs blog.

ERASMUS' ANIMALS: Today's animal proverb from Erasmus is Mutuum muli scabunt (English: One mule scratches another; from Adagia 1.7.96).

BREVISSIMA: The distich poster for today is Durabo. Click here for a full-sized view.


And here are today's proverbial LOLcats:



Post nubila Phoebus.
After clouds, the sun (comes out).

Errare humanum, perseverare autem diabolicum.
To err is human; to persist, however, is devil's work.

TODAY'S FABLE:

MILLE FABULAE: The fable from the Mille Fabulae et Una book is Canis et Umbra, a story of greed and delusion, with English versions here; you will also find the illustrations there which display in this animated gif: