Tuesday, June 27, 2017

Latin Proverbs and Fables Round-Up: June 27

Here is a round-up of today's proverbs and fables - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. My schedule is kind of erratic this summer, but I'll try to post at least once a week. :-)

You can keep up with the latest posts by using the RSS feed, or you might prefer to subscribe by email.

HODIE (Roman Calendar): ante diem quintum Kalendas Iulias.

MYTHS and LEGENDS: The art image for today's legend shows Pentheus, and there are more images here.


TODAY'S MOTTOES and PROVERBS:

TINY MOTTOES: Today's tiny motto is: Semper pertinax (English: Always persevering).

3-WORD PROVERBS: Today's 3-word verb-less proverb is Dura usu molliora (English: Hard things become softer with use)

AUDIO PROVERBS: Today's audio Latin proverb is Omnis est rex in domo sua (English: Each man is king in his own home). To read a brief essay about this proverb and to listen to the audio, visit the Latin Via Proverbs blog.

ERASMUS' ANIMALS: Today's animal proverb from Erasmus is Mus non ingrediens antrum, cucurbitam ferebat (English: The mouse couldn't get into its hole because it was carrying a pumpkin; from Adagia 3.3.79).

BREVISSIMA: The distich poster for today is Non Vivo ut Edam. Click here for a full-sized view.


And here are today's proverbial LOLcats:



Spes alit et fallit.
Hope feeds and misleads.

Longae regum manus.
Long are the hands of kings.

TODAY'S FABLES:

FABULAE FACILES: The fable from the Fabulae Faciles widget is Mors et Senex, in which Death catches a man unawares (this fable has a vocabulary list).

MILLE FABULAE: The fable from the Mille Fabulae et Una widget is Vitis et Hircus, which features a talking vine, with English versions here from my summer Aesop project.


Words from Mythology. For more about the Greek character Mentor and modern mentoring, see this blog post.


Tuesday, June 20, 2017

Latin Proverbs and Fables Round-Up: June 20

Here is a round-up of today's proverbs and fables - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. Don't forget about the Latin LOLCat Randomizer, and there's also a LatinLOLCat Board at Pinterest.

HODIE (Roman Calendar): ante diem duodecimum Kalendas Iulias.

MYTHS and LEGENDS: The art image for today's legend shows The Three Daughters of Cecrops, and there are more images here.


TODAY'S MOTTOES and PROVERBS:

TINY PROVERBS: Today's tiny proverb is: Datum serva (English: Preserve what is given to you).

PUBLILIUS SYRUS: Today's proverb from Publilius Syrus is: Probi delicta cum tegas, leges teras (English: When you conceal the crimes of a good man, you erode the rule of law).

PROPER NAME PROVERBS: Today's proper name proverb from Erasmus is Aegypti nuptiae (English: The wedding of Aegyptus; from Adagia 3.1.3... This refers to any tragic and unlucky event, like the sad wedding when King Aegyptus married off his fifty sons to the fifty daughters of his brother, Danaus, whereupon all the sons but one were murdered by their brides).

ELIZABETHAN PROVERBS: Here is today's proverb commentary, this time by Conybeare: Non semper erit aestas: It will not alweyes be sommer, take tyme when tyme cometh, for occasion will not alwey serve, when the iron ys whote we must strike, least hit be colde agayne.

BREVISSIMA: The distich poster for today is Funde Abunde. Click here for a full-sized view.


And here are today's proverbial LOLcats:



Suum cuique pulchrum.
To each his own is beautiful.

Tranquillo quilibet gubernator.
When it's calm, everyone is a helmsman.

TODAY'S FABLES:

FABULAE FACILES: The fable from the Fabulae Faciles widget is Membra et Venter, a fable about the body politic (this fable has a vocabulary list). Plus you can see English versions now too at my summer English Aesop project.

MILLE FABULAE: The fable from the Mille Fabulae et Una widget is Agnus et Lupus, Bibentes, a famous fable of injustice, with English versions here (a dozen versions so far!).


Freebookapalooza: Classics. Here is today's free book online: Lucian's True Tale by Alfred J. Church.



Saturday, June 17, 2017

Latin Proverbs and Fables Round-Up: June 17

Here is a round-up of today's proverbs and fables - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. If you are looking for free copies of my books, you can find links to all of them here: Fables, Proverbs and Distichs — Free PDFs.

HODIE (Roman Calendar): ante diem quintum decimum Kalendas Iulias.

MYTHS and LEGENDS: The art image for today's legend shows The Sword of Damocles, and there are more images here.


TODAY'S MOTTOES and PROVERBS:

3-WORD MOTTOES: Today's 3-word motto is Rosa petit caelum (English: The rose seeks the sky).

3-WORD PROVERBS: Today's 3-word proverb is Nubilo serena succedunt (English: Fair skies follow the cloudy sky).

RHYMING PROVERBS: Today's proverb with rhyme is: In pratis ut flos, sic cadit omnis honos (English: Like a flower in the meadows, so perishes every honor).

VULGATE VERSES: Today's verse is Beati mites quoniam ipsi possidebunt terram (Matt. 5:4). For a translation, check out the polyglot Bible, in English, Hebrew, Latin and Greek, at the Sacred Texts Archive online.

BREVISSIMA: The distich poster for today is Cura Nulla. Click here for a full-sized view.


And here are today's proverbial LOLcats:



Aut Caesar, aut nihil.
Either a Caesar. or nothing.

Sol efficit ut omnia floreant.
The sun makes all things flourish.

TODAY'S FABLES:

FABULAE FACILES: The fable from the Fabulae Faciles widget is Accipiter Columbam Insequens , in which the hawk experiences karma (this fable has a vocabulary list).

MILLE FABULAE: The fable from the Mille Fabulae et Una widget is Oves Timidae et Pastor, in which the shepherd tries to rouse the courage of his flock.

Pastor et Grex

Greek Bible Art - and Latin and English, too. Below is one of my Greek Bible Art graphics; for the individual Greek, Latin and English versions of the graphic, see the blog post: ἀποκτενῶ σε καὶ ἀφελῶ τὴν κεφαλήν σου ἀπὸ σοῦ. Percutiam te, et auferam caput tuum a te. I will smite thee, and take thing head from thee.


Tuesday, June 13, 2017

Latin Proverbs and Fables Round-Up: June 13

Here is a round-up of today's proverbs and fables - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. If you are a Pinterest user, you might enjoy following the Bestiaria Latina at Pinterest or the Distich Poems Board.

HODIE (Roman Calendar): Idus Iuniae, the Ides of June!

MYTHS and LEGENDS: The art image for today's legend shows The Head of Medusa, and there are more images here.


TODAY'S MOTTOES and PROVERBS:

3-WORD MOTTOES: Today's 3-word verb-less motto is Nunc aut nunquam. (English: Now, or never).

ANIMAL PROVERBS: Today's animal proverb is Dum canis os rodit, socium quem diligit odit (English: While the dog is gnawing a bone, he hates the companion whom he had loved).

POLYDORUS: Today's proverb from Polydorus is: Mutuum muli scabunt (English: One mule scratches another).

GREEK PROVERBS: Today's proverb is Λίθος κυλιόμενος φῦκος οὐ ποιεῖ. (English: A rolling stone gathers no seaweed).

BREVISSIMA: The distich poster for today is In Fortunam Modicam. Click here for a full-sized view. I thought the Aesop's fable about the city mouse and the country mouse would make a good image for this one!


And here are today's proverbial LOLcats:



Natura rerum omnium mater.
Nature is the mother of all things.

Aliud agendi tempus, aliud quiescendi.
There's a time for working and a time for resting.

TODAY'S FABLES:

FABULAE FACILES: The fable from the Fabulae Faciles widget is Simia et Gemelli Eius , a story about parenting (this fable has a vocabulary list).

MILLE FABULAE: The fable from the Mille Fabulae et Una widget is Vulpes Sine Cauda, a fable about fashion.

Vulpes et Cauda Detruncata

Latin Fables Read by Justin Slocum Bailey. Here is today's audio fable: Vulpes, Gallus, et Villicus, with links to the audio and to the blog post.

vulpes et gallus

Thursday, June 8, 2017

Latin Proverbs and Fables Round-Up: June 8

Here is a round-up of today's proverbs and fables - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. I was out of town this week at a wonderful conference, and now back in action with the Bestiaria!

HODIE (Roman Calendar): ante diem sextum Idus Iunias.

MYTHS and LEGENDS: The art image for today's legend shows Bucephalus and Alexander, and there are more images here.


TODAY'S MOTTOES and PROVERBS:

TINY MOTTOES: Today's tiny motto is: Audax ero (English: I will be bold).

3-WORD PROVERBS: Today's 3-word verb-less proverb is Post amara dulcia (English: After bitter things, sweet)

AUDIO PROVERBS: Today's audio Latin proverb is Crescentem sequitur cura pecuniam (English: Worry follows growing wealth). To read a brief essay about this proverb and to listen to the audio, visit the Latin Via Proverbs blog.

ERASMUS' ANIMALS: Today's animal proverb from Erasmus is Asinus asino et sus sui pulcher (English: One donkey thinks another is lovely, as one pig does another; from Adagia 4.10.64).

BREVISSIMA: The distich poster for today is Votum Auctoris. Click here for a full-sized view.


And here are today's proverbial LOLcats:



Lege: sapere aude!
Read: dare to know!

Quaerendo invenietis.
By seeking you will find.

TODAY'S FABLES:

FABULAE FACILES: The fable from the Fabulae Faciles widget is Formica Transformata , the story of a man turned into an ant (this fable has a vocabulary list).

MILLE FABULAE: The fable from the Mille Fabulae et Una widget is Ciconia et Vulpecula, a fable that shows how "turn-about is fair play."

Vulpes et Ciconia

Growth Mindset Memes. For more about this growth cat, see this blog post.


Tuesday, May 30, 2017

Latin Proverbs and Fables Round-Up: May 30

Here is a round-up of today's proverbs and fables - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. You can keep up with the latest posts by using the RSS feed, or you might prefer to subscribe by email.

HODIE (Roman Calendar): ante diem tertium Kalendas Iunias.

MYTHS and LEGENDS: The art image for today's legend shows The Choice of Heracles, and there are more images here.


TODAY'S MOTTOES and PROVERBS:

TINY PROVERBS: Today's tiny proverb is: Cui bono? (English: For whose benefit? ... which is a great proverb to keep in mind as you ponder the political circus these days).

PUBLILIUS SYRUS: Today's proverb from Publilius Syrus is: Is minimo eget mortalis, qui minimum cupit (English: He who wants least needs least).

PROPER NAME PROVERBS: Today's proper name proverb from Erasmus is Ne mihi Suffenus essem (English: I would not be my own Suffenus; from Adagia 2.5.12... Suffenus was a poet quick to criticize others with no awareness of his own faults).

ELIZABETHAN PROVERBS: Here is today's proverb commentary, this time by Taverner: Canis vindictam: A dogge hath a day. There is none so vile nor simple a person, but at one time or other may avenge him self of wronges done unto him. Wherfore it is a wise mans part to contemne no man.

BREVISSIMA: The distich poster for today is Qui Petit Immeritum. Click here for a full-sized view.


And here are today's proverbial LOLcats:



Modum nescit ponere voluptas.
Pleasure knows not how to set limits.

Luna oculus noctis.
The moon is the eye of the night.

TODAY'S FABLES:

Instead of sharing any Latin fables today, I wanted to let you know about a new project I'm working on this summer: an English Aesop project. You can see the blog here: Aesop's Books. I'm focusing on English fables, but this can be a good resource for Latin teachers and students also. I've written up a couple of blogs posts here and here about the project, and I'll be adding lots more books as the summer progresses!





Wednesday, May 24, 2017

Latin Proverbs and Fables Round-Up: May 24

Here is a round-up of today's proverbs and fables - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. Don't forget about the Latin LOLCat Randomizer, and there's also a LatinLOLCat Board at Pinterest.

HODIE (Roman Calendar): ante diem nonum Kalendas Iunias.

MYTHS and LEGENDS: The art image for today's legend shows Philemon and Baucis, and there are more images here.


TODAY'S MOTTOES and PROVERBS:

3-WORD MOTTOES: Today's 3-word motto is Periculum fortitudine evasi (English: By my bravery, I have escaped danger).

3-WORD PROVERBS: Today's 3-word proverb is Nemo nascitur artifex (English: No one is born a master craftsman).

RHYMING PROVERBS: Today's proverb with rhyme is: Si gradus est altus, gravior fiet tibi saltus (English: The higher your position, the heavier will be your fall).

VULGATE VERSES: Today's verse is Vade ad formicam, o piger, et considera vias eius et disce sapientiam (Proverbs 6:6). For a translation, check out the polyglot Bible, in English, Hebrew, Latin and Greek, at the Sacred Texts Archive online.

BREVISSIMA: The distich poster for today is Dis Superis Par. Click here for a full-sized view.


And here are today's proverbial LOLcats:



Sua cuique voluptas.
To each his own pleasure.

Petite, et dabitur vobis.
Ask, and it will be given to you.

TODAY'S FABLES:

FABULAE FACILES: The fable from the Fabulae Faciles widget is Taurus et Culex , a fable about a boastful gnat (this fable has a vocabulary list).

MILLE FABULAE: The fable from the Mille Fabulae et Una widget is Iuvencus et Rusticus, the story of a recalcitrant calf.

rusticus et iuvencus

GreekLOLz - and Latin and English, too. Below is one of my GreekLOLz; for the individual Greek, Latin and English versions of the graphic, see the blog post: Αἱ Ἰβύκου γέρανοι. Ibyci grues. The cranes of Ibycus.


Sunday, May 21, 2017

Latin Proverbs and Fables Round-Up: May 21

Here is a round-up of today's proverbs and fables - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. If you are looking for free copies of my books, you can find links to all of them here: Fables, Proverbs and Distichs — Free PDFs.

HODIE (Roman Calendar): ante diem duodecimum Kalendas Iunias.

MYTHS and LEGENDS: The art image for today's legend shows Actaeon Attacked by His Dogs, and there are more images here.


TODAY'S MOTTOES and PROVERBS:

3-WORD MOTTOES: Today's 3-word verb-less motto is Ex sudore vultus (English: By the sweat of my brow).

ANIMAL PROVERBS: Today's animal proverb is Vacca, quae multum boat, parum lactis habet (English: A cow who moos a lot has little milk).

POLYDORUS: Today's proverb from Polydorus is: Nemo propheta acceptus est in patria (English: No prophet is accepted in his homeland).

GREEK PROVERBS: Today's proverb is Μαχαίρᾳ μὴ πῦρ σκαλεύειν (English: Don't stir the fire with a sword).

BREVISSIMA: The distich poster for today is Prudentia. Click here for a full-sized view.


And here are today's proverbial LOLcats:



Loquere audacter.
Speak boldly.

Vive tua sorte contentus.
Live and be content with your lot in life.

TODAY'S FABLES:

FABULAE FACILES: The fable from the Fabulae Faciles widget is Formica Alata, a fable about being careful what you ask for (this fable has a vocabulary list).

MILLE FABULAE: The fable from the Mille Fabulae et Una widget is Avara et Gallina, a variation on the goose that laid the golden egg, but this time with a typical chicken.

Mulier et Gallina Obesa

Words from Mythology. For more about the CORNUCOPIA, see this blog post.


Tuesday, May 16, 2017

Latin Proverbs and Fables Round-Up: May 16

Here is a round-up of today's proverbs and fables - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. If you are a Pinterest user, you might enjoy following the Bestiaria Latina at Pinterest or the Distich Poems Board.

HODIE (Roman Calendar): ante diem septimum decimum Kalendas Iunias.

MYTHS and LEGENDS: The art image for today's legend shows Heracles and the Bull, and there are more images here.


TODAY'S MOTTOES and PROVERBS:

TINY MOTTOES: Today's tiny motto is: Semper vigilans (English: Always watchful).

3-WORD PROVERBS: Today's 3-word verb-less proverb is Tempus magistrorum optimus (English: Time is the best of teachers)

AUDIO PROVERBS: Today's audio Latin proverb is Non nova sed nove (English: Not new things, but in a new way). To read a brief essay about this proverb and to listen to the audio, visit the Latin Via Proverbs blog.

ERASMUS' ANIMALS: Today's animal proverb from Erasmus is Equo senescenti minora admove (English: Load less on the old horse; from Adagia 2.8.52).

BREVISSIMA: The distich poster for today is Respiciendus Est Finis. Click here for a full-sized view.


And here are today's proverbial LOLcats:



Ultra aspicio.
I look beyond.

Diversis diversa placent, et sua gaudia cuique.
Different people like different things,
and each person has their own pleasures.

TODAY'S FABLES:

FABULAE FACILES: The fable from the Fabulae Faciles widget is Sanctus Petrus et Rusticus , a medieval version of the Aesop's fable that usually features Heracles... with Saint Peter in the hero's place (this fable has a vocabulary list).

MILLE FABULAE: The fable from the Mille Fabulae et Una widget is Vulpecula et Tintinnabulum, a fable about how appearances, and sounds, can be deceiving.

Vulpes et Tympana

Freebookapalooza: Classics. Here is today's free book online: Greek and Roman Ghost Stories by Lacy Collison-Morley. There's also an audiobook version of this one!